banner

Our History

Since 1989 Mental Health America Of Fort Bend County formerly known as Mental Helth Association Of Fort Bend County (MHAFBC) has provided resource information to those seeking to know more about mental illness and their treatments; education and training to help those who help others meet the mental health needs of Fort Bend County; and advocacy to remove the barriers to quality mental health care for those battling with a mental illness. "Providing light, giving hope.”

The National Mental Health Association (NMHA) is the country's oldest and largest nonprofit organization addressing all aspects of mental health and mental illness. With more than 340 affiliates nationwide, NMHA works to improve the mental health of all Americans, especially the 54 million individuals with mental disorders, through advocacy, education, research and service.

NMHA was established in 1909 by former psychiatric patient Clifford W. Beers. During his stays in public and private institutions, Beers witnessed and was subjected to horrible abuse. From these experiences, Beers set into motion a reform movement that took shape as the National Mental Health Association.

"Cast from shackles which bound them, this bell shall ring out hope for the mentally ill and victory over mental illness."

(Inscription on NMHA Bell) ©2004 National Mental Health Association. All rights reserved.

During the early days of mental health treatment, asylums often restrained persons with mental illnesses by iron chains and shackles around their ankles and wrists. With better understanding and treatments, this cruel practice eventually stopped.

In the early 1950s, the National Mental Health Association (NMHA) issued a call to asylums across the country for their discarded chains and shackles. On April 13, 1953, at the McShane Bell Foundry in Baltimore, MD, NMHA melted down these inhumane bindings and recast them into a sign of hope: the Mental Health Bell.

Now the symbol of NMHA, the 300-pound Bell serves as a powerful reminder that the invisible chains of misunderstanding and discrimination continue to bind people with mental illnesses. Today, the Mental Health Bell rings out hope for improving mental health and achieving victory over mental illnesses.

Over the years, national mental health leaders and other prominent individuals have rung the Bell to mark the continued progress in the fight for victory over mental illnesses.

About Us

RECENT NEWS

MORE NEWS